Friday, March 3, 2017

Tool Box: Bring Your Own Adhesives: Types


Tool Box: Bring Your Own Adhesives: Types

March 2017 Series

Papercrafting – as in card-making, scrapbooking, and gift making, would not exist if we didn’t have adhesives to hold our items together. There are other methods of binding, as it were, like stapling or using brads or eyelets, but placing these can be a challenge and require extra tools and then need to be hidden from view. That’s why adhesives are a crafters best friend.

If you are a new papercrafter or a well-seasoned crafter, you know that having the correct adhesive for the job is of utmost importance. Which is why for the next four Fridays I am going to review adhesives, types, which adhesives to use for what application, how to use certain adhesives, and handy adhesive related tools.

Adhesives, by definition, are used to glue or attach stuff together. 

Wikipedia: The use of adhesives offers many advantages over binding techniques such as sewing, mechanical fastening, thermal bonding, etc. These include the ability to bind different materials together, to distribute stress more efficiently across the joint, the cost effectiveness of an easily mechanized process, an improvement in aesthetic design, and increased design flexibility. Disadvantages of adhesive use include decreased stability at high temperatures, relative weakness in bonding large objects with a small bonding surface area, and greater difficulty in separating objects during testing.[4] Adhesives are typically organized by the method of adhesion. 

Using the correct adhesive is important in making your projects look their best and stay looking fabulous!

The following are adhesives currently offered by Stampin’ Up! in the Annual Catalog. 

Fast Fuse Adhesive 
Super-strength adhesive that bonds instantly and neatly. Perfect for heavier layers or small 3D items. Refill offers 21.9 yards for a great value! Acid free. 
Fast Fuse (13.1 yards) • 129026 $10.00 Refill (21.9 yards) • 129027 $7.50 F

SNAIL Adhesive 
Double-sided, instantly bonding permanent adhesive. Easy to apply and refill. Remove with Adhesive Remover. Acid free.
SNAIL (13.1 yards) • 104332 $7.00 
Refill (13.1 yards) • 104331 $4.50 

Fine-Tip Glue Pen
138309 $7.00
Perfect for adhering small embellishments, glitter, and delicate paper cutouts to projects. Cap includes pin to keep the tip clear and prevent drying. 1 oz. 

Multipurpose Liquid Glue - (Green Glue)
110755 $4.00
Crafters’ dream glue! Adheres glitter and other embellishments; includes narrow tip and broad tip. Strong bond; dries clear. 0.9 oz. Acid free. 

Mini Glue Dots®
103683 $5.25
Instant dots of adhesive. No fumes, no mess, no drying time. Holds heavier embellishments. 300 dots. 3/16". 

Tear and Tape Adhesive
138995 $7.00
Strong adhesive with tearable paper backing for easy sticking. Perfect for boxes and 3D items. 27 yards. Acid free. 

Stampin’ Dimensionals
104430 $4.00
Double-sided adhesive foam dots add depth and dimension. Instant bond. 300 pieces. Acid free. 

Foam Adhesive Strips
141825 $8.00
Sheet of adhesive white foam strips for shaker and spinner cards. 1/8" x 9". 10 yards total. 

Washi Tape
Washi tape is commonly made using fibers from the bark of the gampi tree, the mitsumata shrub (Edgeworthia papyrifera), or the paper mulberry, but it's most commonly made using bamboo, hemp, rice, and wheat.

In Japan, it's known as masking tape (マスキングテープ) and the most renowned brand of washi tape is simply called mt - which stands for "masking tape". The term "washi tape" refers to the fact that the tapes are made from Japanese rice paper and differentiates it from typical masking tape you might find in the hardware store.

Stapler - while a not resin glue based adhesive, it does hold items together. It can hold many items together quickly and securely.

Handheld Stapler by Stampin’ Up!
6" x 1" x 2-1/2"; holds mini staples (100 staples included). Staples: 3/8" long; 2,000 silver staples per box. Handheld Stapler • 139083 $10.00 Silver Mini Staples • 135847 $4.00 

Other adhesives you might use in your paper crafting projects: 

Glue sticks (now a retired product from Stampin’ Up! and not pictured, as we have no glue sticks in the house)
What it is:
Glue in a solid form that comes in a plastic tube. You probably recognize these from your childhood.
How to use it:
Apply by rubbing glue on the surface. This is great for covering large areas. Best for use on paper.

Redline Tape (now a retired product from Stampin’ Up!)
Double sticky super sticky tape with a typically red clear nonstick covering on the outside of the strip. This type of adhesive must be cut with a scissors to size, it is non tearable. Many brands exist on the market.

Crystal Effects glue (now a retired product from Stampin’ Up!)
Liquid dimensional adhesive. Self-leveling when it dries and can dry as a mound unless brushed flat. Crystal Lacquer and Diamond Glaze are similar brands. 

Hot Glue or Hot Melt Adhesive
Hot melt adhesive (HMA), also known as hot glue, is a form of thermoplastic adhesive that is commonly supplied in solid cylindrical sticks of various diameters, designed to be melted in an electric hot glue gun. The gun uses a continuous-duty heating element to melt the plastic glue, which the user pushes through the gun either with a mechanical trigger mechanism on the gun, or with direct finger pressure. The glue squeezed out of the heated nozzle is initially hot enough to burn and even blister skin. The glue is tacky when hot, and solidifies in a few seconds to one minute. Hot melt adhesives can also be applied by dipping or spraying.
What it is:
A solid stick of glue that is placed in a hot glue gun which melts the glue as it’s applied. As it cools, the glue becomes solid again.
How to use it:
Use hot glue for just about any type of material (except metal) for fast setting and quick-drying adhesion.

Hermafix Dotto Adhesive (retired Stampin’ Up!)
EK Herma Dotto adhesive is a no mess, no hassle way to glue craft projects, mount photos, or wrap gifts. The double-sided dots go on strong, for a firm hold, and are paper thin for a seamless, clean, finished look. Easy to use...just position and slide dots into place. Repositional, this adhesive is perfect for positioning items when you are experimenting with the layout of your project pieces. These dots are acid-free, archival safe. This refill fits Herma Dotto Dispensers. 49.2 feet.

Many places sell Hermafix or Herma Dot. It comes in a tape runner dispenser that is refillable. The bond is weak. This is a great adhesive if you are looking to try out placements before a final design.

E6000
What is e6000 glue used for?

Amazing E6000 has exceptional adhesion to wood, metal, glass, fiberglass, ceramics, and concrete. It also adheres strongly to leather, rubber, vinyl and many plastics. Amazing E6000 dries clear and once cured, it's waterproof, washer/dryer safe, paintable and safe for photographs.

Mod Podge
What it is:
Decoupage, often referred to as Mod Podge, is used mostly for crafts to bond and seal paper.
How to use it:
As mentioned, Mod Podge is great for bonding and sealing paper but it also gives a nice glossy finish to your work.

Scotch Magic Tape
Scotch® Magic™ Tape is the preferred tape for offices, homes and schools. It's invisible when applied and won't show on copies. This is an ideal tape for permanent paper mending. It can be written on with pen, pencil or marker, it pulls off the roll smoothly. Scotch® Magic™ Tape cuts easily & is very reliable. The tape is photo safe and made in the USA with globally sourced materials.

Packing Tape
Box sealing tape (also "Packing Tape"; "Parcel tape", UK) is a type of packaging tape which is clear or opaque, and used for closing packages for shipment. It is usually two inch (48 mm) or three inch (72 mm) wide and is made of a polypropylene or polyester backing.


 Pictured: all the adhesives discussed above.


I hope you have found this first, Tool Box: Bring Your Own Adhesives: Types of Adhesives, of a series of 4 posts about adhesives helpful to you.

Next in the series – Tool Box: Bring Your Own Adhesives: Basic Adhesives: Let's Stick Together!





Thank you for stopping by today!

Keep being creative, Sandy

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